November 2005


For those of you interested in the topic, one of my yahoo groups (r-f-w) has been discussing the use of musical instruments in the public worship of God.
I have included a few links that have come up during the course of the discussion. They are worth looking into for those interested in the topic of worship.
GI Williamson and others on Instrumental Music http://members.aol.com/rsichurch/worship.html

John Kennedy on Instrumental Music
http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~jbeggsoc/jbs-worship02.html

John M’Donald on Instrumental Music
http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/mdonald.htm

Brian Schwertley on Musical Instrumentation
http://www.reformed.com/pub/music.htm

This is a copy of my daughter’s coloring page from her Sabbath school class (she is two years old). Notice that Presbyterians of the historical kind do not bow the knee to political correctness.
We are to teach the whole counsel of God, and sometimes those truths are not very fun to share. But they are a part of the Gospel. In Genesis 22 we have Abraham going to sacrifice his son to God. God provided a scapegoat in the thicket as a type of the coming Messiah.
Praise God that He provided a scapegoat in His son Jesus Christ. May we glean truth from forbidden coloring pages that liberal Christians do not want us to share in our churches or in our homes with our children.

Discussion Point:
-Share one of your favorite forbidden Bible stories.

I love Christmass as much as the next paleo-Presbyterian.
It looks like the holy day spirit is upon us. Is the Lord pleased?

From Wood TV8:(Cascade Township, November 25, 2005, 12:20 p.m.) It was a dangerous morning on Black Friday at a West Michigan Wal-Mart.
An impatient crowd stormed the doors in the mad rush to get to those door-buster deals inside.
It was an ugly scene when the doors opened at the Cascade Township Wal-Mart. Hundreds of shoppers pushed and shoved their way into the store, trampling a number of customers, sending two to the hospital.
At 5:00 a.m. the doors opened, holiday shoppers rushed in, and immediately one customer is pushed to the ground.
“This is ridiculous. I do not want my life in danger for this,” said shopper Karen Dietstra. “This is not worth it. This has been a tradition for years. I don’t think that I have to get beat up to try to get a sale.”
Two shoppers from Grand Rapids did. One of them, 13-year-old Deja McHerron, had to be taken away by ambulance.
“They stumbled over a pregnant lady and Deja was trying to help her get up. And they stumbled over her and they stepped on her back. And now she’s going to the hospital,” said McHerron’s mother, Deborah.
Duretha Arnold-Youngblood, 37, was also taken to the hospital, complaining of an injured knee. Her husband, Johnny Youngblood, took issue with what he calls a lack of security. Youngblood believes Wal-Mart should hire trained uniformed security guards to help bring order to the early-morning holiday crowd and not leave those duties to Wal-Mart associates.
“They didn’t have no security at all,” said McHerron’s sister, Sierra.
“Wal-Mart did not do enough to protect us,” Dietstra said.
What went wrong? Managers at the Cascade Wal-Mart are not commenting at this time.

Many Christians are very immature in their faith. They understand that the they are to grow in their love for the Lord Jesus and the seek to do so by attending the means of grace. They read, pray, listen to sermons, attend church, even the Lord’s Supper, but something remains missing in their Christian experience. Without being able to verbalize the problem, many Christians in today’s entertainment culture are looking for just that: entertainment.

Even in the most conservative of Reformed and Presbyterian churches you have this problem of entertainment. In these circles this sin will manifest itself in the immature Christian as always needing to chase after a new doctrine or base the “value” of a sermon on whether or not he or she has heard something new. This attitude can be harmful to the Church of Christ. God has chosen to have his people follow the Old Paths…he does not call us to chase after and blaze new ones.

Charles Bridges, in his early 1800s volume to Christian ministers addressed the need for novelty:
The first impressions (of the faith) may have been made rather by the novelty than by the direct power of truth….to live up to the continual excitement of novelty, in preference to the old established truths. This naturally results in an imperfect* apprehension of the Gospel, that fully accounts for defects of Christian temper, as well as for the unsteady resistance to the world…favouratism (sic) in Scripture is both the grandparent of heresy and instability of profession. The Word of God loses its power when displaced from its position, dissevered from its practical connexion (sic), or when a part, however important, is taken for the whole…

*imperfect as in not whole, or not complete.

Bridges sees these people as needing to be novel in faith which leads to a favoratism of certain passages of the bible (examples: John 3.16, I Cor 12 or 13, or Biblical sayings “Judge not”, “All in moderation”, etc.) which will in turn lead to many types of heresy and discontentment in their faith. The anedote to the problem he also gives: prefer the old established truths. This is the calling of all Christians, immature and well seasoned, do not forsake the old paths for the need to be novel and entertained.

Discussion Points:
-How can we encourage the immature in faith?
-What personal disciplines will aid in fighting the need to be entertained (however subtle the need is?)
-What spiritual excercises would you recommed for those struggling against this serious sin?

Jokingly my wife has said to me that the two greatest influences in her life have been a Baptist (Spurgeon) and a Prelate (Ryle). They are both fantastic preachers despite their views on church government, the millennium, and baptism.

I too love Ryle and Spurgeon. May it be duly noted for the sake of my ecumenical spirit.

The latter end of the nineteenth century was a time when preaching was still fantastic in England, but Confessionalism was not. Below is a quote from Ryle on the exalted state of preaching. Any comments?

“A preaching ministry is absolutely essential to the health and prosperity of a visible church. The pulpit is the place where the chief victories of the Gospel have always been won, and no Church has ever done much for the advancement of true religion in which the pulpit has been neglected. Would we know whether a minister is a truly apostolical man? If he is, he will give the best of his attention to his sermons. The minister who exalts the sacraments, or forms of the church, above preaching, may be a zealous earnest, conscientious, and respectable minister, but his zeal is not according to knowledge.”

It has been announced that Reformed Bible College in Grand Rapids, Michigan is changing their name to KUYPER COLLEGE after the famous Dutchman, Abraham Kuyper.

This news has not been made public yet, so please do not tell anyone that you found this information here. I received it from an insider. (Hush!) The name will not be released until the end of the year.

Now RBC, Now KC, will be able to live out their dream of watering down the Reformed faith, loosening their commitment to the Reformed Confessions, and begin to become more “relevant” as a “Christian” institution. Congratulations, I am sure that your founders would be really proud of you.

“There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our
human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign
over all,does not cry: ‘Mine!’ ”
-Abraham Kuyper

Maybe now they can drop their no smoking policy.

There are many Christians today who stand discouraged at the state of the Church and the lack of care (and hostility) for Christianity in our culture. We should commend those that love the Church and long for her purity as she awaits Her bridegroom. Even in the days of the Reformers and the Puritans there were those that saw a cultural disregard for the True Religion. The Church ebbs and flows through history and we must patiently await the day when all peoples and nations will humbly bow to Christ in His law, His gospel, and His will. Until this time, let us turn to Jonathan Edwards’ Humble Attempt for comfort and direction. Thy Kingdom Come.
IT is evident from the Scripture, that there is yet remaining a great advancement of the interest of religion and the kingdom of Christ in this world, by an abundant outpouring of the Spirit of God, far greater and more extensive than ever yet has been. It is certain, that many things, which are spoken concerning a glorious time of the church’s enlargement and prosperity in the latter days, have never yet been fulfilled. There has never yet been any propagation and prevalence of religion, in any wise, of that extent and universality which the prophecies represent. It is often foretold and signified, in a great variety of strong expressions, that there should a time come, when all nations, throughout the whole habitable world, should embrace the true religion, and be brought into the church of God. It was often promised to the patriarchs, that “in their seed all the nations, or (as it is sometimes expressed) all the families of the earth shall be blessed.” Agreeably to this, it is said of the Messiah, Psalm 72:11. “That all nations shall serve him,” and in verse 17. “Men shall be blessed in him, and all nations shall call him blessed.” And in Isaiah 2:2. It is said, that “all nations shall flow unto the mountain of the house of the Lord.” And Jeremiah 3:17. “That all nations shall be gathered unto the name of the Lord to Jerusalem, and shall walk no more after the imagination of their evil heart. “That all flesh shall come and worship before the Lord,” Isaiah 66:23. “And that all flesh should see the glory of God together,” Isaiah 40:5. “And that all flesh should come to him that hears prayer,” Psalm 65:2.

Discussion Points:
-What passages should we pray back to God for the coming of his kingdom?
-What comfort is there in this section of eschatology for the believer?
-What does “thy kingdom come” mean in your own words?

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